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Snow Day on the Riverwalk

6 February, 2010

 

Great times in Old Towne on the Riverwalk.  It was a good day for walking around and taking pictures. 

 

Lots of snow—depending on which cable hype channel you watch or listen to, maybe 30 to 35 inches.  Initially, the wind was blowing fairly hard—you can see the snow being driven sideways in some of the photos—but when it let up people began to come out.  Even with the wind blowing, there were folks sledding down the local “hills” or simply enjoying the outdoors. 

 

One couple, shown in the photos, were wading through snow that was thigh deep.  She kept stopping and posing for him and he’d kneel and take a photo.  I was in the process of taking a picture of him taking a picture of her when she opened her jacket and posed as though she was flashing him a wide open boob shot.  That photo is in this group too.

 

A few of the local “pet-o-philes” actually took their animals out for walks or romps.  My perception of most of the people who keep dogs in these small condos, townhouses, and apartments is that they keep the animals not so much because they’re living alone so much as they have no friends and no hope of finding any.  The scurry up and  down the street with their little plastic poop bags and their little plastic made-for-picking-up-dog-poop gloves, picking up poop that their dogs deposit on the sidewalks, not making eye contact with other people and not doing much talking either.  In the spring, summer and early fall, the streets are crowded with these people walking their animal, but their numbers drop as fast as the temperature and length of the day. 

 

But the dog owners who were out today were of a different breed.  Most of today’s dog walkers didn’t have their dog on a lease and the dogs were running rampant in the snow.  On one hand, this is definitely a violation of sacred local law (with good reason), on the other hand, these are friendly people and their dogs are friendly, too—and there weren’t a whole lot of people out and about.  These people actually initiated conversations, and they didn’t mind being photographed, and the dogs looked like they were having fun—which is nice.  I think that even the really old woman who was being dragged about by her shivering greyhound was having a good time.

 

But not as much fun as the little boys who ran from pile of snow to pile of snow doing belly flops.  Hopefully, they didn’t belly flop on any fire hydrants.

 

I was having fun, too. 

 

All in all, I spent about 3 hours outside.  Some of the snow I walked through (in the park next to the river and near the volley ball court—see photos) was about crotch deep.  Most places it was no more than knee deep.  Up near the Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge, in the wooded area on the south side where the weight of the snow had bent the trees over, I got into some stuff that was almost waist deep.  It was kicking my butt.  Walking through snow that is only a foot and a half deep for a couple of hours can be a good workout for old people like me and by the time I had gone the 1 1/2 miles to the bridge, traipsing back and forth from the unplowed streets to the points I took the photos from, I had sweat through my street clothes, under my parka wind breaker, and I could feel the sweat trickling down my sides and the inside of my arms.  The waist deep snow by the bridge turned it into an “Ironman” challenge for my corpulent body.  Once my shirt and sweatshirt were wet (from sweat), the cold that was being deflected by the parka windbreaker transferred across.  Sometimes this felt good, sometimes, it simply felt cold.  So I stopped short and didn’t get the bridge photos I wanted. 

 

Tomorrow, I’ll head over the Sports Authority and buy a pair of snow shoes.  The next time we get a good snow, I’ll get the photo I want.

 

Here is the link:  http://www.ecmorton.com/art/snowday20100206/index.htm

 

Please enjoy.

 

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